Running With Scissors, Patterns by Annie

I used one of Annie Unrein’s (Patterns by Annie) newest patterns:
Running With Scissors to sew this useful case.
The name of the pattern itself is clever,
but the assembly instructions for this one
are some of the most clever from any of the Patterns by Annie.

I started by quilting my main fabric, Soft and Stable,
and lining fabric together using my Block Rockit quilting machine.
BTW, I have my 14″ Block Rockit on a 5 foot frame.
In my opinion, that is the perfect set up for a bag maker such as myself.
The cotton quilting fabric that I use is 44/45 inches wide,
which fits perfect on the 5 foot frame.
Also, I don’t ordinarily quilt large quilts, just lap size,
so my set up stays this way all the time.
I prefer to quilt my fabrics and soft and stable all in one large piece
because cutting of all the components of the bag goes very quickly
after the fabric is all quilted.
Patterns by Annie usually follow a general set of steps.
In case you missed it, click here for my blog post on those steps.
There is an updated method of sewing the handle and “spine” support for this pattern.
It is different from other By Annie patterns that I have sewn in the past.
I really, really like the new method.
It helps keeps the top of the bag from bowing when it is filled with your supplies.
Speaking of supplies, you can fit a plethora of sewing supplies
(or whatever type of supplies you plan to carry) in this handy case.
The interior of the spine features fold-over elastic bands to hold items such as spools of thread.
And there are numerous slots and zippered pockets (vinyl, mesh, and quilted fabric).

Another plus about this pattern, is that the construction is done flat.  

← Interior

Exterior→
The zipper does not go in until the interior and exterior have been completed.
After the zipper and zipper tab are done,
the binding is added and that is the last step.
Here is what I have to say about the zipper and tab:
1.  After inserting the zipper, cut it the length instructed in the pattern,
then, if it is too long for your taste, cut a little off at a time until it is the length you wish
(for my personal taste, this zipper tail is too long, so I plan to cut it down by about half).
2.  Add a metal zipper end for a more professional touch:
Gather your zipper end supplies and mark the length of your zipper

Cut the zipper along your marked line (DO NOT use your good fabric scissors)

Roll the sides of the zipper toward the center on the wrong side of the zipper

Use a dab of glue for added security
(my favorite is Guterman HT2, available on Amazon)

Push the zipper down into the zipper end as far as it will go
and allow the glue to set for about 30 minutes

Add the teeny, tiny little screw that comes with the zipper cord end,
and tighten it down with a teeny, tiny screwdriver

Here’s what it looks like on the top side

In case you haven’t had enough of my ramblings,
here’s a video to give you a closer look at my tool case:

Thank you so much for reading my blog.
Have a terrific time sewing your own tool case.

A Natural Pair – Butterfly Bush/Ivory

Happy Saturday sewists!
This week’s natural pair is the white butterfly bush and
the ivory By Annie handbag zipper.
Although the butterfly bush is called white,
it leans more toward the ivory side,
as you can see in the photo above.
The butterfly bush (generic name Buddeleia Davidii) comes in
several colors:  pink, purple, red, white, yellow
I have the pink, purple, and white growing in my backyard.
True to their name, the butterflies love them — and so do the hummingbirds and bees!
Butterfly Bush is a deciduous shrub here in zone 5,
but it can be an evergreen in warmer zones.
Be careful in those warm zones, though, it could become invasive.
That’s not the case here in colder zones.
I just cut mine back almost to the ground every winter and it grows to be about 10 feet tall
the next summer; and it is a prolific bloomer from late July through frost.

My pink and white butterfly bushes are side by side and they make a massive statement!

I used a By Annie ivory handbag zipper on my Ultimate Travel Bag.
If you don’t need a true, stark white zipper, the ivory is a nice neutral choice.
Thank you for visiting.

How To: Five Easy Steps to Sewing with Patterns By Annie

If you are new to sewing a bag, tote, or organizer
getting started may seem a bit daunting.
Most of the patterns do not include actual pattern pieces.
That’s because the components are pretty much rectangles
or squares with rounded corners.
So the getting started instructions may seem extensive and intimidating.
If you look at the By Annie patterns with the following five steps in mind,
the process will come together much easier:

                                                                    1.  Gather
                                                                    2.  Quilt
                                                                    3.  Cut
                                                                    4.  Construct
                                                                    5.  Assemble

1.  Gather all your supplies as indicated on the back of the pattern and read through all the instructions before you start cutting.  Each pattern includes a back page that lists all the supplies you will need.

2.  Quilt your main fabric, Soft and Stable, and lining.  If you do this on your domestic machine, follow the cutting instructions before layering your fabrics and Soft and Stable for quilting.
If you are quilting your layers on a longarm machine, then do not cut the main fabric, Soft and Stable, and lining until after the quilting is completed.  **Instructions for each method are in the pattern**

3.  Cut all your pieces (including your quilted fabrics) as instructed.

4.  Construct all the components for your project.

5.  Assemble your components as instructed.

I have sewn a number of patterns By Annie and all of them have followed these five steps.  When I break down the process by thinking of it in five steps, the project seems less overwhelming.  I like to set my goals according to these steps.  For instance:  Day 1 Gather: Day 2 Quilt: Day 3 Cut: Day 4 (and maybe day 5 if there are lots of components) Construct; and Day 5 (and/or 6) Assemble.

So if you’ve had your eye on one of those great patterns By Annie (or if you already have one), but have been a bit intimidated at the process, I hope this gives you the confidence to get started on your own bag, tote, or organizer.

I’ll be back in a few days with my completed Running with Scissors organizer.

Have a terrific weekend.