Silhouette Patterns #600: Classic Blouse

**Please Note** Links to the pattern, fabric, interfacing, etc. are listed on YouTube below my video (video link at the end of this post)

I don’t own a lot of blouses, therefore, I don’t wear a lot of blouses. I’m not sure why. Perhaps it is because RTW button up blouses seem a bit stiff – the collar stands up too high and rubs my chin line, so I end up with makeup all over the collar of my blouse – the bodice area is too snug, so all my rolls show – if I purchase a blouse that is not so snug in the bodice area, then the shoulders are too wide and droop down my arm! This blouse pattern addresses all those issues. I shall be wearing more blouses in the future!

I sewed this blouse with a cotton/rayon blend voile shirting that I purchased from Stylemaker fabrics. It is so lovely and soft, no stiffness at all.

The collar is attached to the blouse body. No collar stand so it does not stand up high enough to rub my jaw line.

The bodice features front and back waist darts that can be sewn into the garment, or left off completely. I sewed the waist darts (front and back) because I like the little bit of added shaping that they give. The blouse has shape without being too snug and the shoulders still fit nicely.

To give a little stability to the under collar and the placket, I used Pro Tricot Deluxe Knit Fusible interfacing from Fashion Sewing Supply. The pattern suggests fusible knit interfacing, but Peggy Sagers discourages using interfacing on her sew along video on YouTube. In my video, which I link below, I address this discrepancy and why I chose to interface the collar and the placket.

The pattern notions listed on the back of the envelope, indicate you will need 8 buttons – 6 for the blouse and 2 for the cuffs. I used 10 buttons – 8 for the blouse and 2 for the cuffs. That was a personal preference choice.

The sleeve does not have an actual cuff such as one thinks of a traditional sew-on cuff. But rather, the sleeve has extra circumference that is folded over at the wrist to create a sort of psuedo-cuff effect.

This is what the sleeve looks like when it is not buttoned.

Here’s a photo of the placket/yoke on the inside of the blouse.

I would love to hear your thoughts. Please leave a comment below.

If you are interested, here’s a video of my review:

Closet Case Patterns Cielo Top & Dress

Hello Sewers! Here is a look at my muslin-testing process to bring me to the point of stitching up my version of the Cielo Dress.

I used a cotton/linen blend fabric from Hobby Lobby to make my muslins. I used the same fabric to make two muslins. For the first one I sewed a size 12 straight from the envelope with no adjustments and no design changes. On the second muslin I used my Silhouette Pattern Armhole Templates to change up the fit in the armhole area. Take a look at my video at the end of this post to see which version I prefer. 🙂

Close up of the fabric

When I stitched the sleeves to the armholes (both versions), I used the Silhouette Patterns method of stitching with the sleeve on the bottom and the bodice on the top, which is opposite of how I was taught to insert sleeves. Sewing with the sleeve on the bottom makes it so I don’t have to stitch two rows of basting stitches and pull up the threads to fit the sleeve into the armhole area. It just naturally eases into the area beautifully.

I use LOTS of pins when I do this
If you are inserting your sleeve with this method, be certain to check underneath periodically to make certain you are not getting any of the actual sleeve caught up in the seam.
Sewing with my left hand between the bodice and the sleeve helps me feel any wrinkles or rogue fabric that might be working its way into the seam

A unique dart in this dress is the bust dart that comes in from the armhole. I’ve never seen a pattern with a dart placed at that position.

I like the design details such as the sewn down cuff and the insert in the back yoke area.

The pattern piece for the bottom half of the dress and the in-seam pockets is rather odd shaped. I have to be honest, even after reading the instructions, I wasn’t quite sure how this was going to go together!

Per the pattern instruction, I marked three sewing lines on my pattern piece (you can see them in white). I sewed the three lines with the pattern piece right side together with the bodice pattern piece. Then the fabric above those lines is folded down (so it is right side up) over those two U-shaped portions of the pattern (those are the pockets). The sewn lines form the front seam and where it is not sewn – those are the openings to the pockets. Clever..

I used my serger to sew this dress together, so all the seams are nicely finished.

Here is a video review of my Cielo Top & Dress:

Thank you for stopping by today, I appreciate the time you take to read my blog posts.

Fall 2019 Sewing Plans

Hello Stitchers! It’s time to get sewing on our fall seasonal clothing. I am adding a few pieces to my wardrobe this year.

Here is a video where I show you my new fabrics and the patterns that I plan to pair with them:

Enjoy!

Thank you for stopping by. Please leave a comment and let me know what you are planning to add to your wardrobe this fall.