The Valentine Dress That Is, and the Blog Post That Almost Was

Happy February, sewing friends!
This is McCall’s 7186.
My intent was to blog a review of this one in late January.
My photographer has been traveling out of town extensively, so no pics.
*sigh*
Perhaps a photography session will take place near the end of the month
when we are both in town.
Until then, this is my only picture of this close-fitting knit beauty.
Sorry for the teaser, but there will be a full post toward the end of February.
For those of you who are machine embroiderers,
here is some cute inspiration:
This little ornithological creation is an in-the-hoop design from Pickle Pie Designs.
I used inexpensive felt from Hobby Lobby.
Clear vinyl was used for the cute little peek-a-boo-belly heart window.
I put the jelly beans in their own little clear bags and heat sealed them closed
before they became part of the owls’ abdominal contents.

On the back there is a lapped closure in which to insert sweet treats.
It doesn’t show up so great in these photos, but I used glitter felt for the eyes.
I appreciate the time you spend reading my blog.
Thank you so much for stopping by.
Have a l❤vely Valentine’s Day.

Candy Corn Garland

Here’s a papercrafting project that also uses a bit of sewing, or serging, as the case may be.
This garland is hanging from the side window of my cute, backyard potting shed.
The candy corn cut file is a free download from Hey Let’s Make Stuff.
I cut the card stock on my Cricut Maker and for each candy corn,
I cut two of each of the yellow and orange components
( one for the front and one for the back)
because I knew the back side would show since it was going to hang in a window.
That way my candy corn is double sided.
I’ve seen a number of paper, felt, fabric, etc. garlands stitched together with the sewing machine.

That is an effective way to quickly make garland, but if you have a coverstitch serger,
the chain stitch gives you more flexibility in designing your garland.
When using a sewing machine, the candy corn would have to be right next
to each other because sewing machines are not meant to sew without something under the needle.
But a serger allows you to endlessly chain off without anything passing under the needle.
I spaced my candy corn pieces about 12-15 inches apart from one another.
That way I didn’t have to spend a lot of time making numerous candy corn pieces,
but I could still make my garland the length I needed to drape in front of my window.
I used Coats and Clark polyester sewing thread in the needle,
and I used Sulky 12 weight thread in the chain looper.

And I set my stitch length to 1.

That combination gave me a nice, sturdy chain for my garland.
I will definitely be putting my Cricut Maker and
my Baby Lock Triumph to use making more
seasonal garland in the upcoming months.
Do you make your own garland?
Do you use papercrafting, quilting, sewing, or something else?
I would love to hear about your garland decorating endeavors.
Please leave a comment, I enjoy hearing from you all.

Going Batty

This girl.  Love her so much.
We have an extra close granddaughter/grandma bond.
That said, our taste in “stuffies” is night and day.
Her plush animal collection includes dragons, chickens, and viruses.
Yes, viruses!!!
Mine would include bears, puppies, and butterflies.
So when she found a pattern on Etsy and asked me to help her sew it
– of course I said yes –
and of course I wasn’t surprised that it was a pattern for a stuffed bat.

Okay, I admit, it’s pretty cute.

She picked out the fabrics.
The head is stuffed with polyester stuffing.
The body is stuffed with polyester stuffing and Polypellets.
The eyes are plastic safety eyes.
The bat’s name is Nebula.
My granddaughter LOVES her little bat.
Treasure the sewing journey with your little ones, my friends.
Happy Sewing!