Let’s Talk Ironing

Hi Sewing Friends!
Today’s topic is ironing
From Merriam-Webster:
Full Definition of ironing

1 :  the action or process of smoothing or pressing with or as if with a heated iron

I would like to add “using a silk organza press cloth” to end of that definition

Here are a few advantages of using silk organza press cloths:
  • silk organza doesn’t melt, it withstands high heat
  • it is sheer, so you can easily see your fabric or project underneath
  • it is lightweight and easy to store, it doesn’t take up much space
  • it can be machine washed and dried
  • it helps protect your clothing or sewing project from scorching and melting
I’ve used silk organza press cloths for years
and I’m so pleased to now offer them in my shop
Do you use pressing cloths when you iron?
Please leave a comment, I really enjoy hearing from my readers
Thanks for visiting today

If a Sewist Could Cut Continuous Binding, How Much Continuous Binding Could a Sewist Cut . . .

I prefer to cut my own binding rather than to purchase the prepackaged type.
That way I have access to an endless assortment of colors and prints.

I was making a cute wrap skirt for my cute granddaughter (more on that in a future post),
and I wanted to use my handy dandy Bernina binder attachment for the skirt binding,
so my binding strips had to be cut at 1 1/2 ” wide.
Now there are oodles of tutorials out there on how to make continuous bias binding,
so I won’t try to reinvent the wheel.
If you need good instructions on said process, go here and/or here.

It doesn’t look like that small piece of fabric (I used a 12″ square) will yield much binding
but you might be surprised at the results.
I’ve always wondered just how much binding could a sewist cut with varying size squares of fabric.
I’m here to tell you that a mere 12″ square will result in a whopping 200 inches, or 5 1/3 yards,
of beautiful 1 1/2″ bias binding strips.
Your bias binding can be used to finish armhole edges, neckline edges,
or outside edges of anything from aprons to cute, little granddaughter wrap skirts.

When you use the bias binder attachment, roll up your flat binding strip and drop it into
a container such as a mason jar
(a beautiful blue jar enhances the sewing enjoyment).
That way, the binding strip won’t tangle or knot as you’re sewing.

I found that when I placed the jar on the floor in front of my machine,
the binding twisted just as it entered the bias binder attachment.
Not good.

However, when I positioned the jar next to and in front of my sewing machine,
all went smoothly.
Good.
I hope this helps you, my friends.
As I have occasion to make other widths of continuous bias binding,
I will update this post with those results as well.
Or . . . if you have made continuous bias binding with this method,
by all means, share your results with us.
 Until next time, bind away!

Fall Sewing

I can’t wait to wear those beautiful, new, green suede shoes.
The green plaid Pendleton wool (gifted from my friend, Linda)
sewn up in Simplicity 2475 will perfectly pair with those new shoes.
I adore suede shoes.
I coat them with a water repellent spray and they serve me well all fall and winter.
Am I the only one who buys shoes first, then sews the outfit to match?
Some may consider that a bit backwards.
It works for me.
There will be a capelet to match the skirt.
More on that later.
Have a terrific rest of the week, my friends.