Silhouette Patterns #120: Patty’s Princess Seam Top

Here’s my test version of this princess seam top. Overall I’m quite pleased with the outcome. The color washes me out a bit, but that has nothing to do with the pattern and everything to do with the fabric. 🙂 BTW, the fabric is a medium weight, stable knit from Joann Fabrics.

I sewed a size 3, and the pattern calls for 2 yards of 60″ wide fabric. This is how I laid out my pieces. I did not measure the length of fabric, but I know it did not use 2 yards. I’m guessing it was about 1 1/3 yards of fabric.

I always use my quilting ruler to measure from the straight of grain pattern line to the fold of my fabric so I don’t get any garments that hand with a skewed drape.

These odd little marks are on the side back pattern piece along the princess seam edge. I’m not sure for what they are to be used. There is no indication on the instruction sheet and this is the only pattern piece on which they showed up. I just ignored them!

The sleeve pattern has a dart, which was an interesting addition that I’ve not come across until now. Here is what it looks like when finished:

I discuss the arm dart more in my YT video. There is a link at the end of this post.

The neckband is attached in a continuous loop, then the “V” is made by sewing a small dart into the band. Here is a look at the inside of the neckband where that dart is sewn:

When you sew the dart, be careful to sew ONLY the neckband being careful to not catch any of the garment under neath your presser foot (do not go past the seam line or you will have a pucker at the point of the “V” – trust me, I speak from experience.

Thread sinks into knit fabric and it is a real challenge to pick out stitches without making a hole in the fabric (see example above) *sigh*.

This is an easy top to sew and I like the little bell sleeve.

Here is my YT video:

Thank you for spending a few minutes of your day with me. 💜

If you have questions or comments, please leave them in the comment section below. I really enjoy feedback from my readers. Until next time, happy sewing!!!

Closet Case Patterns Cielo Top & Dress

Hello Sewers! Here is a look at my muslin-testing process to bring me to the point of stitching up my version of the Cielo Dress.

I used a cotton/linen blend fabric from Hobby Lobby to make my muslins. I used the same fabric to make two muslins. For the first one I sewed a size 12 straight from the envelope with no adjustments and no design changes. On the second muslin I used my Silhouette Pattern Armhole Templates to change up the fit in the armhole area. Take a look at my video at the end of this post to see which version I prefer. 🙂

Close up of the fabric

When I stitched the sleeves to the armholes (both versions), I used the Silhouette Patterns method of stitching with the sleeve on the bottom and the bodice on the top, which is opposite of how I was taught to insert sleeves. Sewing with the sleeve on the bottom makes it so I don’t have to stitch two rows of basting stitches and pull up the threads to fit the sleeve into the armhole area. It just naturally eases into the area beautifully.

I use LOTS of pins when I do this
If you are inserting your sleeve with this method, be certain to check underneath periodically to make certain you are not getting any of the actual sleeve caught up in the seam.
Sewing with my left hand between the bodice and the sleeve helps me feel any wrinkles or rogue fabric that might be working its way into the seam

A unique dart in this dress is the bust dart that comes in from the armhole. I’ve never seen a pattern with a dart placed at that position.

I like the design details such as the sewn down cuff and the insert in the back yoke area.

The pattern piece for the bottom half of the dress and the in-seam pockets is rather odd shaped. I have to be honest, even after reading the instructions, I wasn’t quite sure how this was going to go together!

Per the pattern instruction, I marked three sewing lines on my pattern piece (you can see them in white). I sewed the three lines with the pattern piece right side together with the bodice pattern piece. Then the fabric above those lines is folded down (so it is right side up) over those two U-shaped portions of the pattern (those are the pockets). The sewn lines form the front seam and where it is not sewn – those are the openings to the pockets. Clever..

I used my serger to sew this dress together, so all the seams are nicely finished.

Here is a video review of my Cielo Top & Dress:

Thank you for stopping by today, I appreciate the time you take to read my blog posts.

Simplicity 8376 Serger Knit Top

Hello sewers and sergers!
Here is an easy, quick, nice-fitting pattern for your summer tops.
Simplicity 8376 gives many options for pattern hacking.
This one is View 1, the Base Pattern.
It is the perfect pattern for not only new-to-knit sewers,
but also for experienced sewers who might be new to using an overlocker.
You do not have to sew this on a serger/overlocker,
but the pattern and the overlocker make a perfect pair.
If you are in the local area, I’m teaching this as a Baby Lock Serger event
at Wimmers in Layton on Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
My Silhouette Cameo teaching friend, Dana,
will be joining me to show you how to add a monogram to your top.
Price of admission includes
your fabric (the fabric has a beautiful drape – it is viscose and spandex),
vinyl monogram, lunch, and lots of fun.
We will discuss knit fabric choices,
I will give you tips for matching stripes,

we will attach a self-fabric neck band,

and we will stitch the entire top using Baby Lock sergers.
Okay, let’s go sew some new summer tops.
Thanks for visiting.