Closet Case Patterns Cielo Top & Dress

Hello Sewers! Here is a look at my muslin-testing process to bring me to the point of stitching up my version of the Cielo Dress.

I used a cotton/linen blend fabric from Hobby Lobby to make my muslins. I used the same fabric to make two muslins. For the first one I sewed a size 12 straight from the envelope with no adjustments and no design changes. On the second muslin I used my Silhouette Pattern Armhole Templates to change up the fit in the armhole area. Take a look at my video at the end of this post to see which version I prefer. 🙂

Close up of the fabric

When I stitched the sleeves to the armholes (both versions), I used the Silhouette Patterns method of stitching with the sleeve on the bottom and the bodice on the top, which is opposite of how I was taught to insert sleeves. Sewing with the sleeve on the bottom makes it so I don’t have to stitch two rows of basting stitches and pull up the threads to fit the sleeve into the armhole area. It just naturally eases into the area beautifully.

I use LOTS of pins when I do this
If you are inserting your sleeve with this method, be certain to check underneath periodically to make certain you are not getting any of the actual sleeve caught up in the seam.
Sewing with my left hand between the bodice and the sleeve helps me feel any wrinkles or rogue fabric that might be working its way into the seam

A unique dart in this dress is the bust dart that comes in from the armhole. I’ve never seen a pattern with a dart placed at that position.

I like the design details such as the sewn down cuff and the insert in the back yoke area.

The pattern piece for the bottom half of the dress and the in-seam pockets is rather odd shaped. I have to be honest, even after reading the instructions, I wasn’t quite sure how this was going to go together!

Per the pattern instruction, I marked three sewing lines on my pattern piece (you can see them in white). I sewed the three lines with the pattern piece right side together with the bodice pattern piece. Then the fabric above those lines is folded down (so it is right side up) over those two U-shaped portions of the pattern (those are the pockets). The sewn lines form the front seam and where it is not sewn – those are the openings to the pockets. Clever..

I used my serger to sew this dress together, so all the seams are nicely finished.

Here is a video review of my Cielo Top & Dress:

Thank you for stopping by today, I appreciate the time you take to read my blog posts.

Simplicity 8376 Serger Knit Top

Hello sewers and sergers!
Here is an easy, quick, nice-fitting pattern for your summer tops.
Simplicity 8376 gives many options for pattern hacking.
This one is View 1, the Base Pattern.
It is the perfect pattern for not only new-to-knit sewers,
but also for experienced sewers who might be new to using an overlocker.
You do not have to sew this on a serger/overlocker,
but the pattern and the overlocker make a perfect pair.
If you are in the local area, I’m teaching this as a Baby Lock Serger event
at Wimmers in Layton on Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
My Silhouette Cameo teaching friend, Dana,
will be joining me to show you how to add a monogram to your top.
Price of admission includes
your fabric (the fabric has a beautiful drape – it is viscose and spandex),
vinyl monogram, lunch, and lots of fun.
We will discuss knit fabric choices,
I will give you tips for matching stripes,

we will attach a self-fabric neck band,

and we will stitch the entire top using Baby Lock sergers.
Okay, let’s go sew some new summer tops.
Thanks for visiting.



The Valentine Dress That Is, and the Blog Post That Almost Was

Happy February, sewing friends!
This is McCall’s 7186.
My intent was to blog a review of this one in late January.
My photographer has been traveling out of town extensively, so no pics.
*sigh*
Perhaps a photography session will take place near the end of the month
when we are both in town.
Until then, this is my only picture of this close-fitting knit beauty.
Sorry for the teaser, but there will be a full post toward the end of February.
For those of you who are machine embroiderers,
here is some cute inspiration:
This little ornithological creation is an in-the-hoop design from Pickle Pie Designs.
I used inexpensive felt from Hobby Lobby.
Clear vinyl was used for the cute little peek-a-boo-belly heart window.
I put the jelly beans in their own little clear bags and heat sealed them closed
before they became part of the owls’ abdominal contents.

On the back there is a lapped closure in which to insert sweet treats.
It doesn’t show up so great in these photos, but I used glitter felt for the eyes.
I appreciate the time you spend reading my blog.
Thank you so much for stopping by.
Have a l❤vely Valentine’s Day.